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Last Updated on : 14th Sep, 2015
 
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Binge-Eating Disorder

What is Binge-Eating Disorder?

Eating disorders in childhood and adolescence remain a concerning public health problem. Among the newer of these disorders, Binge Eating Disorder (BED) has a prevalence that ranges from 1 to 2%. The health consequences of eating disorders are often severe with follow-up studies finding an aggregate mortality rate for AN of 5.6% per decade. Other significant medical problems common in adolescents with eating disorders include growth retardation, pubertal delay or interruption, and peak bone mass reduction. Binge eating disorder is diagnosed if a person has recurrent and persistent episodes of binge eating. Binge eating has been defined as episodes that involve at least three of the following: (a) eating much more quickly than usual, (b) eating until uncomfortably full, (c) eating a lot when not hungry, (d) eating alone due to embarrassment about how much one is eating, and (e) feelings of sadness, guilt or disgust with self after overeating. The person must also be notably upset by their binge eating. Finally, there is no compensatory behaviors seen in some other eating disorders (such as purging).

As can be seen here, there are no current treatments for binge-eating disorder above level 3. Some promising evidence has been reported with internet-based CBT and some preliminary tests have been conducted with interpersonal therapy and dialectical behavior therapy.
 

Binge Eating Disorder

Well Established

What does this mean?

  • None

Probably Efficacious

What does this mean?

  • None

Possibly Efficacious

What does this mean?

  • Internet-Based CBT (Self Help)

Experimental

What does this mean?

  • Interpersonal Therapy (Individual)

  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy (Individual and Family)

Not Effective

What does this mean?

  • None

Source: Lock, J. (2015). An Update on Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Eating Disorders in Children and Adolescents. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology , 44(5), 707–721. http://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2014.971458

 

 
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